BTS Undorn Atelier Shoot

Some time back we did a concept shoot for the Norwegian Designer Karina K. Titze of Undorn and Jeweler David-Andersen.  We had this uber cool location for a day,  just an hour outside of Oslo, Norway. I think it’s and old mill house, or something in that line. Anyways, we arrived to a freezing cold location and set up in this awesome room as you can see in the pictures. I we found a couple of electric heaters, which were able to raise the temperature to about 4 degrees celsius… After filling the whole area up with smoke and making sure the fire alarm went off 4-5 times, we finally started shooting our models, wearing beautiful dresses and jewelry worth more than $150 000.

Jon Rune Trengereid

Lets smoke this place!!!

Jon Rune Trengereid

Doesn’t look like it, but this place was freezing!!

Jon Rune TrengereidJon Rune TrengereidJon Rune Trengereid

The Hero himself… ME!

Jon Rune Trengereid

“Backstage”

Untitled 1708Jon Rune TrengereidJon Rune TrengereidJon Rune Trengereid

The team after an 12 hour workday.

Jon Rune Trengereid

 

 

-jr-

L’Oreal Academy shoot, how it was lit…

A few posts back I posted some behind the scenes photos from a shoot we did at the L’Oreal Academy, in Oslo. Here are two of the final images and some short info on how everything was lit.

The model was styled in the image of Birgitte Bardot, which was one of last years inspirations to the L’Oreal Collection. Below are two of the final images. Birgitte was a strong and independent woman, something we wanted to shine through in our images.

 Jon Rune Trengereid

Jon Rune Trengereid

The models view looked like this. Have you ever tried the Profoto XL umbrella? 

Jon rune Trengereid

We had some concerns about how the light spread would be on this location; low ceiling and shiny back wall. I couldn’t do anything about the ceiling, but decided to use the back wall to my advantage. The reflective surface gave me a free “spot” on the back wall. The vignetting is all natural and thanks to the large Profoto XL umbrella.

The main light was the Profoto white beautydish. I chose this rather than the silver one because of the 65° light spread compared to the 26° of the silver one. I knew I had to put the light fairly close to our model and needed as much spread as possible(without lighting up the whole room). The beautydish had an energy output of f/4,5 and lit up the face and upper body. The Profoto XL umbrella worked as a fill light and was set to f/4, just half a stop under the the main light, softening out shadows and evening out the light.

From behind the model, two Profoto 1×1,3′ softboxes creates an even and soft rimlight. These strobes were set to f/6,3. 1/3 of a stop brighter than the exposure. The right-hand side softbox was pointed slightly upwards, and lef-thand side slightly downwards. 

All light sources used on this shoot was powered by Profoto D1 500ws Air‘s.

Jon Rune Trengereid LightingSetup

Thanks for reading.

 

-jr-

Test shoot with Undis from EB Models

A few weeks back I did a test shoot with the lovely Undis from EB Models. I wanted these fashion images to easily be considered as a set of portraits, and decided to go with a large light source to get smooth and soft shadows. The lighting was real simple and done with a Profoto 5′ Octa mounted with a softgrid as the main light; powered by a Profoto Pro-8a.  Here’s the final result and some info on how we sat up the light to get this look.

Undis by Jon Rune Trengereid

Undis by Jon Rune Trengereid

Undis by Jon Rune Trengereid

 

I used a Canon 1Dx and a EF 85mm f1.2L II set to 1/200 sec at f/2,8, ISO 100. As always I overexposed the image with 1/3 of a stop to make sure I get all the information the sensor can hold. More about that in another blogpost.

I sat up the Profoto head with the 5′ Octa and the softgrid on the right side of the model who was placed about 3 feet from the backdrop. As you probably know the larger the light source the softer the light. There is one other thing that also defines the light quality, contrast. The closer you set the light to your model, the higher the contrast. So if you want soft shadows(where light gradually turns to shadows) use a large(relative) light source, and if you want high contrast(how deep the shadow go compared to the lights parts of your image) put the light source close to your subject. 

The main light was set high with the help of a Avenger A4050CS stand, about 20″ above the models head and approx 3′ in front of her. The direction of the light was set so that the center of the octa points just below her chest. This means that her head is lit by a really feathered light to create soft shadows but with a fairly high contrast, as you can see in her dark eyes. Also there is hardly any spill over to the background due to the direction of the light and the soft grid attached. 

When I sat up the light I initially wanted a rim light on the models left side, but I soon realized that this was not in coherence with the look I was after and dialed the rimlight down 2 stops opening up the deep shadows but without leaving any “visible trace” of a second light source.  Dialing down 2 stops from 2.8 is not something all strobes can do, but it was not a problem for my Profoto D1 250w. I sat up a large black portable wall to flag the light from the camera.Undis lighting setup by Jon Rune Trengereid

 

Thanks for reading and feel free to ask me any questions you may have.

 

-jr-

 

 


BTS at the L’Oreal Academy

Behind the scenes from my latest job with L’Oreal.
It was a fun day as always, even though I was dead tired after a 14 hour workday.
A couple of times each year L’Oreal hosts a “training camp” for hair professionals who want to get certified within the L’Oreal color system. The week ends with a large shoot that puts the students and their newly acquired knowledge to the test.

Final results in a later post with a tutorial on how the shoot was done 🙂

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-jr-

Profoto Softgrids…

Their called softgrids, but should really be called AWESOME LIGHT CONTROL UNITS…

A while back I lost my profoto softmasks for my 1×4 stips and haven’t really taken the time to buy new ones, until now. The last major beauty shoot I did for a large client, made me realize how much I missed and needed them. Whats cool is that not long ago Profoto announced their new RFi series of softboxes, and with that also reduced the MSRP(suggested retail price)– A LOT!  Profoto also introduced a collection set of new softgrids, which is what this blogpost is all about.

For those of you who doesn’t know what a softgrid is, here’s a simple explanation; its a grid and its soft. Yeah yeah, there’s of course more to it. The softgris is mounted on your softboxes like this:

1×4 Softbox

IMG 1445 2

And since Profoto have been so kind to reduce their prices, I got myself a softgrid for my 5′ Octa as well:

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 So, why would you want a softgrid? Basically a softgrid does the same thing as a metal grid would for your reflector; it concenrates the light. In the case of these new Profoto softgrids, with 40 degrees. Concentrating the light translates into control.

If you never seen the effect of a softgrid here’s one mounted on a 5′ Octa:

Without softgrid, at f/16:

V2Q9490

And with a softgrid, same settings at on the image above:

V2Q9489

As you can see, with the softgrid the lights doesn’t spread and bounce around in the room.  Its concentrated, BUT with the same nice and soft shadows you would expect from a 5′ octa.

Softgrids are a must have, don’t you think?

(sorry for not lighting a model or anything interesting, I was just too excited to not post this)

 

-jr-